Conversations from Calais: Episode 11

The Conversations from Calais project was started in October 2019 by London-based graphic designer Mathilda Della Torre. The aim of the project is simply to re-humanise the refugee crisis by giving a voice to migrants in Calais.

Let’s talk about talking!

As soon as I saw the Conversations from Calais Instagram, I knew I needed to talk to the founder about talking, so I made contact with Mathilda. She calls herself a ‘good designer’ because she designs with the aim of doing good for people. In the podcast she explains that there were many ways to do this project badly, but that this simple black and white poster presentation, documenting real conversations with migrants as they are submitted by Calais volunteers, felt ‘natural, raw and simple.’

Conversations from Calais poster
Conversations from Calais poster, documenting real conversations
between migrants and volunteers in Calais.

Why include Conversations from Calais on The Language Revolution Podcast, you wonder? In the first ten episodes we have looked at talking from a neuroscience, psychology, education, and linguistics perspective. Our voices matter to us, and having a voice is central to our experience as humans. As Ben Crystal explored in Episode 6, we need to speak what is in our hearts. But what if our voice is silenced, or gets taken away, or manipulated by the media?

Bearing Witness

Mathilda explains that the project grew out of her stints as a volunteer in Calais. She is not rewriting the migrants’ stories but sharing a very specific moment between the volunteer (‘I’) and the migrant (‘you’). It is important that the pronoun ‘you’ is the migrant – they are the first person we are talking to, and not the othered ‘they’ of a lot of media coverage. These are real people, like you. Mathilda doesn’t use colour or embellishment such as photographs or videos because the words speak for themselves and bear witness to the migrants’ situations, as you can see from the examples below:

How are the stories curated?

Mathilda does very little to alter the stories. Volunteers submit them in English, and most people are now submitting the conversations in the I/You format. Some are perhaps too long for one poster, so Mathilda will split them across two posters. But as for any control of the narrative, she doesn’t impose any kind of stance on the conversations. She posts them in pretty much chronological order, as they are submitted to her. The themes that emerge – there is hope and despair, resilience and (sadly) violence – are testament to the fact that every migrant has a different story, just as every human does. There is not one narrative that can be called ‘the migrant story’. The hero or victim dichotomy is a false one. Yes, there is heroism. Yes, there is victimisation. But it is far more nuanced than that.

Heard across the world

The posters are having a remarkable effect, with people posting them in 50 cities on five continents as of January 2020. It is sure to be more at the time of going to press as the following rapidly grows for this important project. In fact, I have watched the Instagram following double in the few weeks since we recorded and can see that the project resonates around the world.

Get involved!

If you can get the posters on billboards, or translate the posters, or would like to invite Mathilda to speak, please get in touch with her on conversationsfromcalais at gmail dot com. Follow Conversations from Calais on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, and share the posts with your circle. Further ideas on how to make a positive impact are discussed in the podcast. It is available on all the usual podcast providers or by clicking the play button below this final poster.

Conversations from Calais poster
Yes, the world knows.
Please, do share these Conversations from Calais as widely as you can.

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It's time for a little language revolution, n'est-ce pas?

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